Something good but weird just happened.

I was sitting at my desk 10 minutes ago, marking some tests, when the guy at the desk next to me sat down. He has my year 9 English kids for Maths.

“Your poem about the stalker got me in,” he said.

I tore myself away from what I was concentrating on and blinked.

“What?”

“The kids showed me your poem. At first I didn’t realise what was happening, but they kept saying, “Keep reading!” and then half way down the page I realised what was going on. It was really good. I enjoyed it.”

I’m not sure what I said, but it was a strange feeling, almost like my worlds were colliding. (I had a fleeting sense of sympathy for my kids when I pick them up at parties and other kids freak out and call me “Miss”.) I was rapt that I hadn’t misread the class yesterday and that they really DID get into the poems, but it was also a bit strange… as if people were reading things behind my back. Well, that’s a stupid thing to say, because of course they were, but it was an eerie feeling nonetheless. (Especially in a MATHS class…. the natural enemy of the English teacher…)

I think on the whole I’m glad that the kids are really getting into the poetry thing, but it makes me wish that I’d written a better poem if they’re going to start bandying it about to my work colleagues…

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13 Responses to Something good but weird just happened.

  1. meggie says:

    Of course, you realise now, that you will have to give us your poem, or you will drive us crazy with curiosity.

  2. Eleanor says:

    Stop.right.there.

    Now.

    Will you ever feel any poem that you write is “perfect”? I doubt it. I reckon the closest thing to a perfect poem is one which makes a connection with its reader. Therefore your poem is a resounding success.

    QED (that’s math-speak for “I just proved that my hypothesis about your poem being good is true, so there”)

    This is no time for self-criticism and modesty, this is the time for dancing around the house with glee and writing more poems.

  3. Eleanor says:

    Another thing…

    A long time ago I read an article about an English professor at an American university who had his poetry students set up a stall in the middle of the town centre. It was a free “poetry stall,” any member of the public could sit down and request a poem on a particular subject. The students were very nervous about this, but they soon realised that the general public simply ADORED the poems. The subjects requested ranged from a love poem to a pregnant wife, a political argument, going fishing, football etc etc etc.

    I have always thought that if I was an English teacher I would want to do that with my class. Maybe you can do that within your school????

  4. trash says:

    I want a poem about a two ‘evil’ black dogs, one a puppy who eats everything, the other an old man dog who won’t play with the puppy in public. What is your going rate?

  5. persiflage says:

    Again, how terrific. Yes, please do share your poem. I am thinking of moving interstate and going back to school, for some inspiring education…
    I generally wrote only doggerel – which was quite good fun, but does not reach any heights other than occasionally tweaking the funny bone. That is, if the funny bone is up somewhere.

  6. The Gnome says:

    Me thinks you have a new admirer in the person of the mathematics teacher (who, like all mathematicians, is probably a terminally frustrated poet). Bonne chance.

  7. M says:

    I’m thinking your poem must’ve been pretty damn fine.

  8. Wish I’d kept the poems pupils wrote. Once destroyed, gone forever.

  9. jenb says:

    I’d really like to read the poem also!

  10. Jayne says:

    Yes, you must share the stalker poem with us now, for we will be hanging on the edge of our seats, a precipice of your own making, and will not be satisfied until we know the whole.
    As Eleanor said, you’d never think your poem was ‘finished’ or perfect enough as you’re the creator but those reading it are the judges and have found it far from wanting 😉

  11. ann says:

    sounds like an awesome poem, care to share to blog world…………….

  12. Scott says:

    I know exactly which maths teacher you’re talking about! When I left last year he thanked me for all the “wisdom advice and cuddles”.

  13. river says:

    I’m sorry I haven’t been around much, I kept getting an “internet explorer cannot load the page” type mesage. Molly looks lovely with her haircut and I like the non-girly quilt. I’m not a fan of pink either. It’s great that your year 9 kids are doing so well, of course I knew they would, you’re such an awesome teacher.

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